Dr Grigorios Theodosopoulos investigates the management challenges faced by hospices in England

Approximately 70% of the available palliative care beds in England – that is, places offering end of life care for terminally ill patients – are managed by voluntary sector organisations. The great majority of these organisations, known as hospices, are independent local charities, which are subject to an increasing number of regulatory demands covering areas as diverse as health and safety, patient treatment, and value for money. There are also a number of key stakeholders, and associated relations, that impact on what hospices do, and how. Figure 1 illustrates these stakeholder relations.

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Dr Grigorios Theodosopoulos has researched the management challenges faced by hospices in England, and has recently published a paper on this topic. The paper reveals that hospices are called upon to provide an ever-increasing range of clinical and other services, for which they need to secure funding via innovative income generating initiatives. Drawing on interviews and financial data, the research conducted by Dr Theodosopoulos and his co-authors sheds light on:

  • The complexity of the funding model used by these organisations
  • The scarcity of appropriately skilled staff for clinical, nursing and fundraising work
  • The extended demand for hospice care driven by population demographics

 

Dr Grigorios Theodosopoulos is a Senior Lecturer in accounting, and a member of the Accounting and Auditing Research Centre, at Brunel Business School. He is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, member of the British Accounting and Finance Association, member of the Voluntary Sector Studies Network and has broad working experience in accounting, commercial auditing, and management. His research focuses on the development and application of an accounting business models’ framework within voluntary sector organisations. His teaching interests include: contemporary issues in accounting research, financial reporting and analysis, and introductory accounting.

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The research paper is entitled ‘Accounting for voluntary hospices in England: A business model perspective’, and was published by the journal Critical Perspectives on Accounting. For further information about this work, or for a copy of the paper, please contact Dr Theodosopoulos here.

ANZMAC Best paper award for Dr Marcia Christina Ferreira

Dr Marcia Christina Ferreira, a lecturer in marketing at Brunel Business School, and researcher in the Marketing and Corporate Brand Management Research Group, won the best paper award in the Consumer Culture Theory track, at the prestigious marketing conference ANZMAC, organized by Australia and New Zealand Marketing Academy.

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The paper, titled “The Enmeshed Paths of Consumers as Collectors”, explores the publicisation of once-private collections on social media. This research investigates how the design, materials, and marketing efforts objectified in the branded products interweave consumers and objects through different levels of sociality, leading consumers to develop enmeshed individual and collective paths as collectors.

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Co-authored with Dr Daiane Scaraboto from Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, and Dr Emily Chung from RMIT University, this paper brings new insights into understanding collectors and their pathways towards becoming (or ceasing to be) devoted collectors. Their approach uses a more dynamic and integrative perspective that is different to the simplistic, linear manner adopted by prior research. The insights revealed by this study can also in turn help brand managers develop tools to better relate to its most loyal consumers.

Masters in Management enters the Financial Times rankings

graduation-2016-08-smaller-2The Business School is delighted to announce the inclusion of its Masters in Management programme in the 2017 Financial Times ranking in their list of the top 95 degrees in Management.

The School’s MSc in Management is ranked 78, just below places like Bath and above triple accredited Manchester and Bradford.

It’s the School’s first entry since 2014 when the AACSB accreditation was introduced as an eligibility requirement for the FT submission.

Importantly it is indicative of the satisfaction of BBS Masters in Management alumni as reflected in the feedback they provided when specifically surveyed by the Financial Times for the ranking.

More information about the MSc Management, here.

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Another successful PhD conference for Brunel Business School

BrunelBBS PhD Symposium Group photo BBS (2) 20 per centBusiness School held its annual PhD conference on the 4th and 5th May with over 20 of its PhD students presenting papers to an audience of peers and experienced researchers.

The annual conference invites Business School doctoral students, at any stage in their programme, to put forward a paper for the conference and to present it over the two-day event.

62 doctoral student papers were received for assessment by the conference panel and 10 top paper accolades were awarded at the event.

The annual doctoral conference was created by the Business School to allow PhD students to get valuable engagement with the research community as well as to hear from experienced researchers. Key note speakers for the event were Professor Bradley Barnes from Sheffield Hallam University, and Professor Jǒskos Brakus from Leeds University Business School

Head of School, Professor Christos Pitelis opened the event and Professor Bill Leahy, Deputy Vice Chancellor for academic affairs and civic engagement presented awards to the 10 PhD students whose papers received the highest scores from reviewers.

Look before you leap to the cloud, councils warned

cloud-2104829-1280Local authorities and public sector organisations should do their homework before switching to the cloud.

That’s the lesson from a new study that tracked what happens when local councils transferred services to cloud computing.

Local authorities across Europe are urged to move in-house IT services – such as servers, email and telephones – to internet-based providers amid pressure to cut costs. Warwickshire County Council and the London Borough of Hillingdon were among the UK’s first to announce plans to switch around 2012.

A study of three local councils found the cloud brought several pluses, but authorities tend to make the shift too hastily, with one council instantly hit by hackers.

“These findings have messages for both local government and central government,” said Dr Uthayasankar Sivarajah at Brunel University London, part of the research team.

“One of the authorities faced an immediate security breach that caused chaos,” said the lecturer in operations and information systems management. “Data was accessed illegally by an unauthorised third party and the private sector cloud provider blamed human error.”

Government strategists predicted in 2011 that switching to the G-Cloud or Government cloud could save £3.2bn because as a shared service, costs are spread among organisations. But despite cost-cutting pressure, many public sector managers see the cloud as more a liability than labour saver, with data security and downtime the biggest fears.

Making it easier to work from home and better information management are key advantages to councils switching to cloud-based technologies, the team found. Major cons meanwhile are a lack of data ownership and loss of control and governance, because of a grey area around who has access to information.

The study also revealed a general feeling among workers that their authority’s move was a purely rushed attempt to meet the political agenda. “There are huge black holes between what the councils are trying to do and what they are achieving,” said Dr Sivarajah. The biggest lesson to councils, he underlined, is that “the right person needs to drive and lead the implementation and sell it to the workers.

“At operational level they could all see real benefits in cost savings. But it is still early days and we don’t know what the long-term impact will be. That may take 10 years to find out. It might reduce the headcount in IT departments, but I can’t see it cutting out the need for them altogether.”

Find out more about Brunel Business School

This story by Hayley Javis, Media Relations, first appeared on the Brunel University London website on 24th April 2017 and also features in the following trade publications: Computer Weekly,  Government Technology, Public Sector Executive, LocalGov, PublicFinance, Digital By Default News , Cloudpro and Diginomica.

Dr Aida Hajro nominated to the editorial review board of The Academy of Management Review

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Dr Aida Hajro, Senior Lecturer in International Business at BBS, has been nominated to serve on the editorial review board (ERB) of The Academy of Management Review (AMR). AMR is among the highest cited (impact factor of 7.82) and ranked (#1 among business journals and #1 among management journals) of all management journals, and is distributed quarterly to 16,073 subscribers. Being nominated to the ERB is an acknowledgement of Aida’s accomplishments as a researcher and further proof of the great work done by BBS scholars.

The Brunel MBA has Maintained its Tier One Position in CEO Magazine’s 2017 MBA Rankings

The Brunel MBA has maintained its Tier One position in CEO Magazine’s 2017 MBA Rankings in Europe, a category it shares with thirty-three European MBA programmes including those from Trinity College Dublin, Copenhagen Business School and ESADE, Spain.CEO European Tier 1 2017

The global business magazine writes of its awards scheme, “CEO Magazine has been showcasing top business schools from around the globe since it first launched in 2008. In 2012 the publication launched its annual Global MBA Rankings, profiling MBA, Executive MBA and Online MBA programmes. This year CEO Magazine reached out to business schools across North America, Europe, Australia, New Zealand and the BRICS, and received responses from over 160 institutions – a 20 per cent increase in submissions from 2016.”

“We’re very pleased to have sustained our position in the CEO Magazine’s MBA Rankings and continue to look for opportunities to expand and build on our programme’s success – ultimately to the benefit of our MBA candidates,” Dr Dimitrios Koufopoulos, MBA Director, Brunel Business School.