Look before you leap to the cloud, councils warned

Featured

cloud-2104829-1280Local authorities and public sector organisations should do their homework before switching to the cloud.

That’s the lesson from a new study that tracked what happens when local councils transferred services to cloud computing.

Local authorities across Europe are urged to move in-house IT services – such as servers, email and telephones – to internet-based providers amid pressure to cut costs. Warwickshire County Council and the London Borough of Hillingdon were among the UK’s first to announce plans to switch around 2012.

A study of three local councils found the cloud brought several pluses, but authorities tend to make the shift too hastily, with one council instantly hit by hackers.

“These findings have messages for both local government and central government,” said Dr Uthayasankar Sivarajah at Brunel University London, part of the research team.

“One of the authorities faced an immediate security breach that caused chaos,” said the lecturer in operations and information systems management. “Data was accessed illegally by an unauthorised third party and the private sector cloud provider blamed human error.”

Government strategists predicted in 2011 that switching to the G-Cloud or Government cloud could save £3.2bn because as a shared service, costs are spread among organisations. But despite cost-cutting pressure, many public sector managers see the cloud as more a liability than labour saver, with data security and downtime the biggest fears.

Making it easier to work from home and better information management are key advantages to councils switching to cloud-based technologies, the team found. Major cons meanwhile are a lack of data ownership and loss of control and governance, because of a grey area around who has access to information.

The study also revealed a general feeling among workers that their authority’s move was a purely rushed attempt to meet the political agenda. “There are huge black holes between what the councils are trying to do and what they are achieving,” said Dr Sivarajah. The biggest lesson to councils, he underlined, is that “the right person needs to drive and lead the implementation and sell it to the workers.

“At operational level they could all see real benefits in cost savings. But it is still early days and we don’t know what the long-term impact will be. That may take 10 years to find out. It might reduce the headcount in IT departments, but I can’t see it cutting out the need for them altogether.”

Find out more about Brunel Business School

This story by Hayley Javis, Media Relations, first appeared on the Brunel University London website on 24th April 2017 and also features in the following trade publications: Computer Weekly,  Government Technology, Public Sector Executive, LocalGov, PublicFinance, Digital By Default News , Cloudpro and Diginomica.

Masters in Management enters the Financial Times rankings

graduation-2016-08-smaller-2The Business School is delighted to announce the inclusion of its Masters in Management programme in the 2017 Financial Times ranking in their list of the top 95 degrees in Management.

The School’s MSc in Management is ranked 78, just below places like Bath and above triple accredited Manchester and Bradford.

It’s the School’s first entry since 2014 when the AACSB accreditation was introduced as an eligibility requirement for the FT submission.

Importantly it is indicative of the satisfaction of BBS Masters in Management alumni as reflected in the feedback they provided when specifically surveyed by the Financial Times for the ranking.

More information about the MSc Management, here.

FT table and for more information

Another successful PhD conference for Brunel Business School

BrunelBBS PhD Symposium Group photo BBS (2) 20 per centBusiness School held its annual PhD conference on the 4th and 5th May with over 20 of its PhD students presenting papers to an audience of peers and experienced researchers.

The annual conference invites Business School doctoral students, at any stage in their programme, to put forward a paper for the conference and to present it over the two-day event.

62 doctoral student papers were received for assessment by the conference panel and 10 top paper accolades were awarded at the event.

The annual doctoral conference was created by the Business School to allow PhD students to get valuable engagement with the research community as well as to hear from experienced researchers. Key note speakers for the event were Professor Bradley Barnes from Sheffield Hallam University, and Professor Jǒskos Brakus from Leeds University Business School

Head of School, Professor Christos Pitelis opened the event and Professor Bill Leahy, Deputy Vice Chancellor for academic affairs and civic engagement presented awards to the 10 PhD students whose papers received the highest scores from reviewers.

Dr Aida Hajro nominated to the editorial review board of The Academy of Management Review

Aida Hajro_opt v2

Dr Aida Hajro, Senior Lecturer in International Business at BBS, has been nominated to serve on the editorial review board (ERB) of The Academy of Management Review (AMR). AMR is among the highest cited (impact factor of 7.82) and ranked (#1 among business journals and #1 among management journals) of all management journals, and is distributed quarterly to 16,073 subscribers. Being nominated to the ERB is an acknowledgement of Aida’s accomplishments as a researcher and further proof of the great work done by BBS scholars.

The Brunel MBA has Maintained its Tier One Position in CEO Magazine’s 2017 MBA Rankings

The Brunel MBA has maintained its Tier One position in CEO Magazine’s 2017 MBA Rankings in Europe, a category it shares with thirty-three European MBA programmes including those from Trinity College Dublin, Copenhagen Business School and ESADE, Spain.CEO European Tier 1 2017

The global business magazine writes of its awards scheme, “CEO Magazine has been showcasing top business schools from around the globe since it first launched in 2008. In 2012 the publication launched its annual Global MBA Rankings, profiling MBA, Executive MBA and Online MBA programmes. This year CEO Magazine reached out to business schools across North America, Europe, Australia, New Zealand and the BRICS, and received responses from over 160 institutions – a 20 per cent increase in submissions from 2016.”

“We’re very pleased to have sustained our position in the CEO Magazine’s MBA Rankings and continue to look for opportunities to expand and build on our programme’s success – ultimately to the benefit of our MBA candidates,” Dr Dimitrios Koufopoulos, MBA Director, Brunel Business School.

Business School makes world’s top five per cent AACSB accredited

fbpost_brunel_aacsb-1_optBrunel Business School (BBS) joins the ranks of the best in the world, after winning a top seal of approval for the quality of its courses and business education.

The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) is the highest global standard for business schools – less than five per cent of Business Schools worldwide are AACSB accredited.

It is a massive boost to job prospects and future earnings for Brunel Business School students and staff.

“This is the best news possible for our students’ employability,” said Professor Chris Pitelis, who heads the school.

Leading international employers see job seekers from AACSB accredited schools as the highest flying business graduates. The five letters confirm best quality teaching and research   staff, most relevant challenging courses and exceptional career opportunities.

The US-based AACSB is the biggest global business education network connecting students, businesses and business schools to kick-start innovation and help society. Business schools face a tough year of scrutiny to make sure they meet its standards and keeping their accreditation means reassessments every five years. It is something Brunel has worked on for the past eight years; its first attempt in 2015 led to a deferral visit.

“After the AACSB’s first visit, we had to satisfy very stringent requirements, based on branding, external perception, decision making and financial autonomy to satisfy the conditions for unit id accreditation status,” said Professor Pitelis.

“We were told that only a three per cent of US Universities and Schools might hope to satisfy these requirements. So this is a major achievement. We are delighted, privileged and proud of the outstanding teamwork from the whole School – students, staff, administrators, strategic leaders,  the accreditation team led by Professor David Gallear and importantly the University and College leadership and administrative staff – that helped get us here.”

Find out about Brunel’s Business School here.

This story was first published on the Brunel University London website on the 2nd December 2016

British Council Newton Fund Workshop on Lean Humanitarian Food Supply Chain in Turkey

nature-669592_1920Brunel University London, UK and Yıldırım Beyazıt University, Turkey will jointly organise a workshop in Turkey on lean humanitarian supply chain and logistics to ensure efficient food distribution in disasters and emergencies.

The planned four day workshop, directed at early and experienced researchers, is to be funded by the British Council Newton Fund Researcher Links Workshop 2016 which seeks to address food supply challenges faced by Turkey in terms of providing the vulnerable and growing refugee population with humanitarian aid.

Turkey is the host to more than 2.5 million Syrian refugees. The displacement of vulnerable people has resulted in a situation underpinned by shortages of quantity, quality and diversity of food products.

The aim of the workshop will be to identify approaches to detecting bottlenecks in food supply as well as improving resilience to with sudden spikes in demand. In addition, the workshop will also consider the management of multiagency stakeholders and the need to deliver logistical support.

Dr Manoj Dora from Brunel Business School and Prof Tunç Medeni from Yıldırım Beyazıt University, Turkey jointly coordinate the workshop in Ankara.

From the UK side, Prof Zahir Irani, Dean of the Faculty of Management and Law, University of Bradford and Prof Amir Sharif from Brunel Business School will be the mentor of this project.

From Turkey side, Prof Hakan Tozan from Yildiz Techical University and Dr Emrah Akbas from Yıldırım Beyazıt University will be the mentor.

The planned four day workshop to take place in Ankara, Turkey in spring 2017 will also highlight future research opportunities on the subject of humanitarian aid and supply chain. 40 researchers (20 from the UK and 20 from Turkey) will be selected on a competitive basis to attend the workshop.

Early and experienced researchers interested in attending should contact Dr Manoj Dora (UK) at manoj.dora@brunel.ac.uk or Dr Tunç Medeni (Turkey) at tuncmedeni@gmail.com.