Vice-Chancellor’s Prize for Doctoral Research awarded to marketing student Dr. Anisah Hambali

Dr. Anisah Hambali, a former PhD student from the Marketing and Corporate Brand Research Group, at Brunel Busines School, Brunel University London, has been awarded the Vice-Chancellor’s Prize for Doctoral Research during the recent  2017 Winter Graduation held in Westminster, London.  The title of her thesis is, “Introducing Celebrity Corporate Brand: Moving Beyond Endorsement and Exploring its Effect on Corporate Brand Enhancement.”

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Dr. Anisah Hambali

Supervised by Dr. Sharifah Alwi and Professor John M.T. Balmer, Dr. Hambali is a worthy receipt of this prestigious accolade not only because of the cutting-edge focus of her thesis, but also the quality and rigour of the study. She has also been a very active PhD member of the Marketing and Corporate Brand Research Group and won the college’s 3-Minutes Thesis Competition in 2016 and represented the college in the final round. In 2013, she was awarded with the Conference Fund Prize by the Academy of Marketing.

 

Dr. Hambali is persuing an academic career and has been appointed as Assistant Professor in Brand Management and Marketing in Sultan Qaboos University, Oman. She takes up this faculty appointment in January 2018.

 

Commenting on her award, Dr Hambali said:

“The award of the Vice Chancellor’s prize is a terrific honour and is the cherry on the cake having completed my PhD on celebrity corporate brand endorsement. I came to Brunel because of its international reputation in corporate branding and to work with Dr Sharifah Alwi and Professor John Balmer who are known authorities in the field”.

 

Congratulations to Dr. Anisah Hambali.

Research: The role of local communities in disaster relief and recovery

A new paper by Brunel Business School expert, Professor Afshin Mansouri, highlights the critical role of local communities in disaster relief and recovery. The paper was co-authored with Dr Jennifer Bealt and published in the January 2018 issue of Disasters. In it, the authors discuss how the local community can form ad-hoc networks to provide effective and efficient disaster management.

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Figure 1. The disaster management cycle
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The relief and recovery activities that need to be performed in the aftermath of a natural disaster (Figure 1) are not only numerous but also varied and complex. Moreover, humanitarian logistics activities are, normally, performed by multiple actors, each with their own set of resources and expertise. As a result, disaster relief and recovery efforts are sometimes thwarted by problems such as:

  • Poor coordination among humanitarian organisations (HOs)
  • Lack of commitment
  • Failures to bridge the gap between relief and development activities
  • Competition for funding, media attention, and scarce resources
  • Managerial attention focused on accountability to donors to the detriment of the needs of the population affected by the disaster

 

Conversely, as Professor Mansouri and his co-author argue, when local responders form collaborative aid networks (CAN), they may greatly improve the success of relief and recovery efforts. This is because of the wealth of knowledge and skills already in existence within those communities. Moreover, their solutions tend to be self-reliant, participatory, and inclusive.

 

Specifically, the involvement of the local community in post-disaster operations has two main benefits:

First, the capacity, local knowledge, and resources possessed by CANs can support relief and recovery efforts significantly. The collaborative nature of local networks allows for improved dissemination of resources and information on needs. Furthermore, their ability to share information leads to more efficient and effective humanitarian operations, tailored specifically to the disaster-affected community. Local knowledge and expertise also has ensured proficient distribution of goods and competent navigation of the terrain.

 

Second, CANs support a more inclusive approach to long-term recovery, a process with which HOs often struggle. CAN involvement in humanitarian operations may increase the resilience of disaster-affected societies and decrease their vulnerability to hazard events in the future. By recognising the power and influence of community-driven supply chains, and the positive effects of community-led engagement in humanitarian operations, the effective communication of needs to a variety of stakeholders is facilitated in the face of adversity.

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An open access (free) version of the paper can be accessed here.

 

Professor Mansouri is Professor of Operations and Supply Chain Management, and Director of Research at Brunel Business School. His research activities focus on improving the effectiveness, efficiency, and fairness of humanitarian operations, as well analysing trade-offs between the environmental, economic, and social sustainability dimensions in supply chains.

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Celebrating the 10th Anniversary of the ground-breaking MSc in Corporate Brand Management

Established in 2007, with Professor John M.T. Balmer as its first Director, the pioneering MSc in Corporate Brand Management has “come of age” as it celebrates its 10th anniversary.  Over the last 10 years, the course has attracted students from all parts of the globe and former students now hold prominent corporate brand management positions.

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MSc Corporate Brand Management Students (2015-2016) at the final group presentations for the Corporate Brand Management Consultancy Elective with Course Director, Dr Sharifah Alwi (front row centre) and the two external assessors from the consultancy industry.

A TRAILBLAZING DEGREE

Its launch – just 12 years after the formal introduction of the corporate brand concept in 1995 – was trailblazing in that it, arguably, was the first Master’s degree anywhere in the world to have corporate brands as its explicit focus.

 

AN UNSURPASSED PEDIGREE

The foundational work on corporate brand scholarship has taken place in the UK. Therefore, it was fitting that a British University should be the first to offer this degree. In launching this degree, Brunel University, as a prominent London-based University, was able to capitalise on London’s status as the capital of corporate brand management and consulting.

 

Moreover, the Marketing and Corporate Brand Research group at Brunel Business School then – and now – has an international profile vis-à-vis its research and scholarship in the corporate branding field.  Professor John M.T. Balmer is, sometimes, credited with formally introducing the corporate brand notion in 1995 and was the first academic to be appointed to a personal chair in corporate brand management at Bradford University. As such, the course is greatly informed by the research and scholarship undertaken by Marketing and Corporate Brand faculty.

 

A SPECIAL ANNIVERSARY

In remaking on the anniversary, the Director of MSc in Applied Corporate Brand Management, Dr Sharifah Alwi, commented: “The 10th anniversary of the degree is a time for real celebration and an opportunity for us to re-engage with our former students who are working across the globe. Thanks are also due to colleagues who have served as Directors of the programme including Professor Balmer, Professor Melewar, Professor Gupta and Dr Heller”

Professor John M.T. Balmer who, as the first director of the course (and who still teaches on the degree) notes: “It has been a huge privilege to be associated with this degree and to have taught so many excellent students, many of whom are now working in the corporate branding sector.”

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Professor John MT Balmer Founding-Director of the MSc in Corporate Brand Management

 

We would like to hear from past students – about your experiences and where you are now. If you are a graduate, contact the Director of the MSc in Applied Corporate Brand Management, Dr Sharifah Alwi: Sharifah.Alwi@brunel.ac.uk

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Director of the MSc in Applied Corporate Brand Management, Dr Sharifah Alwi

Dr Grigorios Theodosopoulos investigates the management challenges faced by hospices in England

Approximately 70% of the available palliative care beds in England – that is, places offering end of life care for terminally ill patients – are managed by voluntary sector organisations. The great majority of these organisations, known as hospices, are independent local charities, which are subject to an increasing number of regulatory demands covering areas as diverse as health and safety, patient treatment, and value for money. There are also a number of key stakeholders, and associated relations, that impact on what hospices do, and how. Figure 1 illustrates these stakeholder relations.

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Dr Grigorios Theodosopoulos has researched the management challenges faced by hospices in England, and has recently published a paper on this topic. The paper reveals that hospices are called upon to provide an ever-increasing range of clinical and other services, for which they need to secure funding via innovative income generating initiatives. Drawing on interviews and financial data, the research conducted by Dr Theodosopoulos and his co-authors sheds light on:

  • The complexity of the funding model used by these organisations
  • The scarcity of appropriately skilled staff for clinical, nursing and fundraising work
  • The extended demand for hospice care driven by population demographics

 

Dr Grigorios Theodosopoulos is a Senior Lecturer in accounting, and a member of the Accounting and Auditing Research Centre, at Brunel Business School. He is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, member of the British Accounting and Finance Association, member of the Voluntary Sector Studies Network and has broad working experience in accounting, commercial auditing, and management. His research focuses on the development and application of an accounting business models’ framework within voluntary sector organisations. His teaching interests include: contemporary issues in accounting research, financial reporting and analysis, and introductory accounting.

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The research paper is entitled ‘Accounting for voluntary hospices in England: A business model perspective’, and was published by the journal Critical Perspectives on Accounting. For further information about this work, or for a copy of the paper, please contact Dr Theodosopoulos here.

ANZMAC Best paper award for Dr Marcia Christina Ferreira

Dr Marcia Christina Ferreira, a lecturer in marketing at Brunel Business School, and researcher in the Marketing and Corporate Brand Management Research Group, won the best paper award in the Consumer Culture Theory track, at the prestigious marketing conference ANZMAC, organized by Australia and New Zealand Marketing Academy.

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The paper, titled “The Enmeshed Paths of Consumers as Collectors”, explores the publicisation of once-private collections on social media. This research investigates how the design, materials, and marketing efforts objectified in the branded products interweave consumers and objects through different levels of sociality, leading consumers to develop enmeshed individual and collective paths as collectors.

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Co-authored with Dr Daiane Scaraboto from Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, and Dr Emily Chung from RMIT University, this paper brings new insights into understanding collectors and their pathways towards becoming (or ceasing to be) devoted collectors. Their approach uses a more dynamic and integrative perspective that is different to the simplistic, linear manner adopted by prior research. The insights revealed by this study can also in turn help brand managers develop tools to better relate to its most loyal consumers.

Dr Andreas Georgiadis contributes to key resource for policy makers

Dr Andreas Georgiadis, Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) in Economics at Brunel Business School, has contributed to the “Disease Control Priorities” (DCP) book series, which has been described by former prime minister of the UK, Gordon Brown, as a key resource for Ministers of Health and Finance.

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Dr Andreas Georgiadis

Dr Andreas Georgiadis’s contribution to this series draws on empirical evidence regarding the impact of interventions on Health and Development during middle childhood and school age, and shows that:

“the effects of early deprivation do not necessarily persist throughout life, especially if environmental circumstances change, and the trajectories of child growth and cognitive development respond rather strongly to growth-promoting interventions after age two years.”

 

The central message of this contribution is, thus, that it is possible to reverse the effects of deprivation in early childhood, through coordinated growth promoting interventions. Given the readership of this book series, it is expected that this work will influence government policy and interventions around education and child health.

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Image source: @DCPThree

 

The latest volume in this important series was presented at an event which included representatives from the World Health Organisation, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and various other dignitaries and policy makers.

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Image source: @DCPThree

More information about the book series is available here.

 

 

Cornerstone Anthology on Chinese Brands by Professor John MT Balmer and Dr Weifeng Chen

A landmark anthology Advances in Chinese Brand Management (2017), edited by Professor John M.T. Balmer and Dr. Weifeng Chen of the Marketing and Corporate Brand Research Group has recently been published by Palgrave Macmillan (an imprint of Springer): ISBN-13: 978-1352000108/ISBN-10: 1352000105

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A timely and singular addition to the canon, owing to the recent upsurge in interest in Chinese brands in the wake of China’s rise as a major economic and branding power, this cornerstone compendium – focussing on the development and management of brands in China- will be of interest to scholars and managers alike. Drawing on articles published in the leading brand management journal, the Journal of Brand Management, the editors have selected a fascinating range of up-to-date articles on branding in China (including Taiwan and Hong Kong).

The compendium includes research and scholarship undertaken by Chinese, British, European and American scholars. The anthology includes contributions by the editors vis-à-vis the development and management of brands in China along with a case study – based on their field research – of the centuries-old (established in 1669), and much-loved corporate heritage brand, Tong Ren Tang (celebrated as the country’s premier traditional Chinese Medicine brand).

Advances in Chinese Brand Management. covers a wide spectrum of topics including empirical studies on luxury brands, prominent cultural brands, counterfeiting, foreign brands in China, and brand-name and logo selection in China.

Professor John M.T. Balmer is Professor of Corporate Marketing at Brunel Business School and is often credited with formally introducing the corporate brand notion. He held the first chair in corporate brand management at Bradford University Business School and is the Chairman of Board of Senior Consultant Editors of the Journal of Brand Management.

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Dr. Weifeng Chen is a lecturer within the business school and is known for his research and scholarship in International Business/Innovation and for his publications on branding in China.

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